10 Function factories

10.1 Prerequisites

For most of this chapter base R is sufficient. Just a few exercises require rlang and ggplot2 packages.

10.2 Factory fundamentals

  1. Q: The definition of force() is simple:

    Why is it better to force(x) instead of just x?

    A: As you can see force(x) is just syntactic sugar for x. From the textbook:

    using this function clearly indicates that you’re forcing evaluation, not that you’ve accidentally typed x.

  2. Q: Base R contains two function factories, approxfun() and ecdf(). Read their documentation and experiment to figure out what the functions do and what they return.

    A: Let’s begin with approxfun() as it is used within ecdf() also:

    • approxfun() takes a 2-dimensional combination of data points (x and y) as input and returns a stepwise interpolation function, which transforms new x values. Additional arguments control how the created function should behave. (The interpolation method may be linear or constant. yleft, yright and rule specify how the newly created function should map new values which are outside of range(x). f controls the degree of right-left-continuity via a numeric value from 0 to 1 and ties expects a function name like min, mean etc. which defines how non-unique x-y-combinations should be handled when interpolating the data points.)

    • ecdf() is an acronym for empirical cumulative distribution function. For a numeric vector, ecdf() returns the appropriate distribution function (of class “ecdf”, which is inheriting from class “stepfun”). Initially the (x, y) pairs for the nodes of the density function are calculated. Afterwards these pairs are passed to approxfun(), which then returns the desired function.

  3. Q: Create a function pick() that takes an index, i, as an argument and returns a function with an argument x that subsets x with i.

    A: In this exercise pick(i) is acts as a function factory, which returns the required subsetting function.

  4. Q: Create a function that creates functions that compute the ith central moment of a numeric vector. You can test it by running the following code:

    A: The first moment is closely related to the mean and describes the average deviation from the mean, which is 0 (within numerical margin of error). The second moment describes the variance of the input data. If we want compare it to var, we need to undo [Bessel’s correction}(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bessel%27s_correction) correction by multiplying with \(\frac{N-1}{N}\).

  5. Q: What happens if you don’t use a closure? Make predictions, then verify with the code below.

    A: Without the captured and encapsulated environment of a closure the counts will be stored in the global environment. Here they can be overwritten or deleted as well as interfere with other counters.

  6. Q: What happens if you use <- instead of <<-? Make predictions, then verify with the code below.

    A: Without the super assignment <<-, the counter will always return 1. The counter always starts in a new execution environment within the same enclosing environment, which contains an unchanged value for i (in this case it remains 0).

10.3 Graphical factories

  1. Q: Compare and contrast ggplot2::label_bquote() with scales::number_format().

    A:

10.4 Statistical factories

  1. Q: In boot_model(), why don’t I need to force the evaluation of df or model?

    A: boot_model() returns

    In this function neither df nor model are used. The relevant values, fitted and resid, are calculated (and therefore evaluated) in the enclosing environment of boot_model.

  2. Q: Why might you formulate the Box-Cox transformation like this?

    A: boxcox3 returns a function where x is fixed (though it is not forced, so it may manipulated later). This allows us to apply and test different transformations for different inputs and give them a descriptive name.

  1. Q: Why don’t you need to worry that boot_permute() stores a copy of the data inside the function that it generates?

    A: The objects created in a manufactured function, like those returned by boot_compute(), are created in the function’s execution environment. Execution environments are ephemeral: once the function is executed, the environment will be garbage collected. As long as we don’t return the execution environment and assign the referencing object, we won’t run into problems.

  1. Q: How much time does ll_poisson2() save compared to ll_poisson1()? Use bench::mark() to see how much faster the optimisation occurs. How does changing the length of x change the results?

    A: Let us recall the definitions of ll_poisson1() and ll_poisson2() and the test data x1:

    A benchmark with this data reveals a performance improvement of factor 2 for ll_poisson2() over ll_poisson1()

    Regarding differing lengths of x1, we expect even further performance improvements of ll_poisson2() compared to ll_poisson1(), as the redundant calculations within ll_poisson1(), become more expensive with growing length of x1. The following results imply that for a length of x1 of 100000, ll_poisson2() is about 20+ times as fast as ll_poisson1():

  2. Q: Which of the following commands is equivalent to with(x, f(z))?

    1. x$f(x$z).
    2. f(x$z).
    3. x$f(z).
    4. f(z).
    5. It depends.

    A: e: It depends ;-). Typically (b) (f(x$z)) is equivalent. However, if x is bound in the current environment, also d (f(z)) is equivalent.

  3. Q: Compare and contrast the effects of env_bind() vs. attach() for the following code.

    A:

10.5 Old exercises

10.6 Closures

  1. Q: Why are functions created by other functions called closures?

A: As stated in the book:

> because they enclose the environment of the parent function and can access all its variables.
  1. Q: What does the following statistical function do? What would be a better name for it? (The existing name is a bit of a hint.)

    A: It is the logarithm, when lambda equals zero and x ^ lambda - 1 / lambda otherwise. A better name might be box_cox_transformation (one parametric), you can read about it (here)[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_transform].

  2. Q: What does approxfun() do? What does it return?
    A: approxfun basically takes a combination of 2-dimensional data points + some extra specifications as arguments and returns a stepwise linear or constant interpolation function (defined on the range of given x-values, by default).

  3. Q: What does ecdf() do? What does it return?
    A: “ecdf” means empirical density function. For a numeric vector, ecdf() returns the appropriate density function (of class “ecdf”, which is inheriting from class “stepfun”). You can describe it’s behaviour in 2 steps. In the first part of it’s body, the (x,y) pairs for the nodes of the density function are calculated. In the second part these pairs are given to approxfun.

  4. Q: Create a function that creates functions that compute the ith central moment of a numeric vector. You can test it by running the following code:

    A: For a discrete formulation look here

  5. Q: Create a function pick() that takes an index, i, as an argument and returns a function with an argument x that subsets x with i.

    A:

10.7 Case study: numerical integration

  1. Q: Instead of creating individual functions (e.g., midpoint(), trapezoid(), simpson(), etc.), we could store them in a list. If we did that, how would that change the code? Can you create the list of functions from a list of coefficients for the Newton-Cotes formulae?
    A:

  2. Q: The trade-off between integration rules is that more complex rules are slower to compute, but need fewer pieces. For sin() in the range [0, \(\pi\)], determine the number of pieces needed so that each rule will be equally accurate. Illustrate your results with a graph. How do they change for different functions? sin(1 / x^2) is particularly challenging.
    A: